3 Natural Remedies for Psoriasis

3 natural remedies for psoriasis

When you’re first diagnosed with psoriasis, treatments typically take the form of steroids and other topical treatments that can make symptoms less obvious.

If you don’t want to go down this road and you’d rather see if natural remedies could help you to get some relief from psoriasis, there are a few that have some good potential for reducing the intensity of psoriasis symptoms.

As with all psoriasis treatments, they won’t cure the condition or stop your symptoms appearing but natural treatments can make them less severe and improve your confidence in your skin without needing traditional treatments.

Here are 3 natural remedies that can help psoriasis symptoms:

Honey

Honey can help to reduce inflammation and ease redness and dryness. Because it’s antibacterial and antimicrobial, it can also protect against the risk of infection if areas of your skin that are affected by psoriasis tend to get cracked and sore.

Manuka honey is one of the best options as it has stronger antibacterial and antimicrobial properties than most other types of honey. The higher grades tend to be more expensive but if your budget stretches far enough, the stronger grades are more likely to help your psoriasis symptoms.

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Studies haven’t really looked at the potential of honey as a psoriasis treatment but anecdotal evidence has shown it can make a lot of difference for some people. You might find it helps to keep symptoms to more of a minimum but may not work so well for plaque psoriasis.

Coconut Oil

Coconut oil is another natural remedy that can be applied to psoriasis affected skin and it’s one that can work well for scalp psoriasis too. One of the reasons for this is its intensive moisturizing qualities, which can add some all important hydration to dry, flaky skin. This also helps it to potentially loosen scales on the scalp. Traditional treatments for psoriasis often involve a combination of coal tar and coconut oil for this reason.

coconut oil

If you decide to give this natural remedy a try, your best bet is to choose pure and organic extra virgin coconut oil. It’s a bit more expensive than other types of coconut oil but it’s more likely to have the results you’re hoping for given its higher quality.

Cinnamon

Cinnamon is very anti inflammatory thanks to the fact that it contains eugenol, an oil that has incredible qualities including being able to hinder NF-kappaB. This is a cytokine that plays a big part in inflammation and could be one of the culprits for your psoriasis symptoms.

The plus points don’t end there either. Eugenol also has an effect on 5-lipoxygenase enzymes, which are thought to be involved in inflammatory conditions such as psoriasis.

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Drinking cinnamon tea and adding the spice to cooking and baking  could help you to reduce inflammation and minimize your psoriasis symptoms.

These three natural remedies can help to make your psoriasis symptoms less noticeable if you apply them or consume them on a regular basis. They’re not miracle cures (unfortunately!) but as most psoriasis sufferers know all too well, anything you can do to help your skin to look better is very welcome. And there’s the added bonus too of not having to rely on creams and other more traditionals  treatments that can have side effects.

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How Does Stress Affect Immunity?

stress and immunity

If you’re struggling with stress and anxiety, you probably also come down with more than your fair share of illness too.

This isn’t just bad luck; according to science, there is a pretty strong link between stress and immunity.  Here’s how stress can affect your health and immunity and some tips on what you can do to cope with chronic stress.

How Does Stress Affect Immunity?

Under normal circumstances, your immune system protects you by tackling bacteria, viruses and other nasties that could make you ill.

Stress affects your body’s ability to fight off these viruses and bacteria, which makes you more likely to be ill. As a double whammy, it also makes it that bit harder to recover, meaning it takes you longer to feel fully well again.

As part of the “fight or flight” response, stress encourages hormones to be released. .This would be great if you were dealing with a genuine threat to your life that required you to get away quickly but it’s bad news when the threat is a bit more mundane.

One of the hormones that is released as part of the “fight or flight” response is cortisol, which is linked to inflammation.

This should only be a temporary effect and once the “threat” is over, hormone production and systems in the body should return to normal fairly quickly.

But with chronic stress, it can mean that the “fight or flight” stress response is  switched”on” most or all of the time. And this leads to inflammation in the body.

As you’ve probably heard, chronic inflammation is said to be a factor in a wide range of diseases and conditions, including heart disease and cancer.

Chronic inflammation can pave the way for conditions such as arthritis, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, lupus, fibromyalgia and psoriasis.

Cortisol also reduces the number of lymphocytes in your body. These are the white blood cells that would normally help to fight infection. Having low levels of these can mean that you pick up every cough and cold going and are prone to developing cold sores, for example.

In one study, researchers asked 276 people about the things that had stressed them out in the past year. They then gave them nasal drops containing the common cold virus to see who was most affected. Almost 40% of the participants did indeed catch a cold, and those who had reported having a lot of stress were twice as likely to be ill.

In the second part of the same study, researchers also looked at the inflammatory response of 79 participants before they exposed them to the cold virus. They found that those who had a weak inflammatory response to begin with also produced more inflammatory cytokines when they got ill.

Depression and Mental Health

It’s not just stress that can deplete your immunity. Studies have shown that depression is also heavily linked to lower immunity, especially in situations that involve chronic stress.

One study looked at depression in older caregivers and found that even mild cases reduced their immunity and this was still the case 18 months later. Researchers concluded that it isn’t how severe the depression is that affects immunity but the length of time that it’s been present.

What Can You Do to Deal With Chronic Stress?

It’s not always easy or even practical to avoid stress, especially if you suffer from a chronic health condition or care for a loved one, for example.

If you can’t avoid stress, the next best thing is to learn how to cope with it so that it’s less likely to have a big impact on your immunity.

A few things you can try include:

Relaxation remedies: The mind-body connection is strong but you can use it in a positive way by harnessing relaxation techniques such as meditation, mindfulness, visualisation and guided imagery.

Overcoming negative thinking: Negative thinking and anxiety tend to go hand in hand and can cause a lot of stress. Studies have shown that people with a positive outlook on life have better immunity so there are a lot of big benefits attached to overcoming negative thinking.

Building a strong support network: In recent years, loneliness has been flagged as one of the biggest risk factors for chronic ill health – potentially even more so than obesity and smoking. People with stronger support networks have been shown to benefit from better health and immunity.

Eat well: Eating a healthy, balanced diet with plenty of fruits and vegetables is recommended for tackling stress but there are also foods that you should limit as much as possible. Refined sugars, caffeine, alcohol and processed foods are all best restricted as they can promote inflammation.

Exercise regularly: Exercise encourages feel good endorphins, which can boost your mood and it’s also a good way to relieve stress. There are benefits for immunity too as being physically active increases your body’s white blood cells, which can be depleted by stress. High intensity physical activity has the most effect on white blood cells.

Have some fun:  Laughter also increases your body’s white blood cells and helps to reduce stress hormones.

 

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What to Eat for Anxiety (And What to Avoid)

anxiety foods

What you eat can have a big impact on your health and wellbeing, and mental health is no exception to this. Some foods have been shown to have a positive effect on anxiety symptoms while others are known to make anxiety worse. Here are some of the key foods and drinks that can help to reduce anxiety, plus some of the ones to avoid.

What to Eat for Reducing Anxiety

Fruits

Antioxidants protect against oxidative stress, which can alter key neurotransmitters in the brain. In one study, anxiety has been linked to low consumption of antioxidants so it’s definitely worth upping your intake of fruit if you’re struggling with anxiety. Aim for as many different colours as you can to get a range of nutrients as well as antioxidants.

Salmon

Salmon is linked to a healthy brain, not least because it’s a good source of vitamin D and fatty acids EPA and DHA. All of these nutrients are thought to help to regulate the dopamine and serotonin neurotransmitters, which are linked to calmness.

Adding more salmon to your diet can be an easy way to improve your wellbeing and it’s backed up by research too. In one study, men who ate Atlantic salmon three times per week also experienced less anxiety.

Turkey

Turkey is a good source of L-tryptophan, an amino acid that the body uses to produce serotonin. It’s been shown to improve symptoms of depression and social anxiety.

Fermented Foods

Fermented foods such as yoghurt, kefir and sauerkraut promote a healthy gut, which has a lot more to do with your brain than you might think. Studies suggest that eating probiotics and fermented foods regularly can be good for anxiety – even to the point of potentially preventing anxiety and depression. One study in particular looked at the role that fermented foods can play in treating social anxiety.

Turmeric

If you’re not adding this spice to your diet on a regular basis, you’re missing out on another chance to decrease anxiety symptoms.

It’s thought that turmeric may help the body to produce more of the omega 3 fatty acid, DHA, which is linked to key neurotransmitters in the brain.

Another factor is turmeric’s anti inflammatory qualities. This can reduce inflammation in the body and decrease inflammatory markers such as cytokines, which are also connected to anxiety and depression.

Water

Wondering about what to drink to tackle anxiety? Water is a great choice. Even being just a little bit dehydrated can affect your mood and how your brain functions, which in turn can promote anxious thoughts and feelings. One theory is that it is linked to a primal survival strategy to find water and stay hydrated but whatever the real reason, water is definitely one drink to reach for when you’re anxious.

Green Tea

Green tea contains L-Theanine, an amino acid that has shown potential for encouraging relaxation and relieving some of the physical symptoms of stress, including a fast heart rate.

Drinks containing L-Theanine can also reduce levels of the stress hormone, cortisol. Sipping green tea several times per day can potentially bring cortisol levels down so it’s a great choice when you’re feeling stressed and anxious.

Other studies on mice have suggested that green tea can reduce anxiety to much the same extent as some anxiety medications.

Camomile Tea

According to a study from the University of Pennsylvania, drinking chamomile tea for 8 weeks helped to reduce anxiety symptoms and promote relaxation.

In another study, taking chamomile extract for 8 weeks was shown to reduce anxiety symptoms and demonstrate antidepressant effects.

Unfortunately it seems that drinking chamomile tea doesn’t have quite the same effects for reducing anxiety compared to the extracts (which are stronger), although there is a lot more research to be done in this area before any definite conclusions can be made. One plus point in favour of chamomile tea is the ability to help to make you feel calmer. And that’s always welcome when anxiety is starting to take hold!

Foods and Drinks to Avoid for Anxiety

So now you know about the foods and drinks that can help to reduce anxiety, what about the main culprits in promoting it?

Caffeine

Caffeine stimulates the nervous system and one study even found that it can make you more likely to have a panic attack, especially if you’re already prone to anxiety.

Processed Foods

Processed and sugary foods are a double whammy for anxiety. They spike your blood sugar to begin with and then encourage it to crash. According to a study from Colombia University, it also increases your riskincreases your risk of depression and mood changes – especially for women.

Alcohol

Drinking alcohol can make anxiety worse for more than a few reasons. It can affect blood sugar, is dehydrating and can even change neurotransmitters in the brain if you drink regularly and in excess.

The more you drink, the worse it can be. One study found a strong link between social anxiety and alcohol dependency.